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  • Korokova + Holiday Cookie Round-Up + Oh Hey!

    Oh hey. Hi. How's it going?

    I have missed this space. Like, literally: I have clearly missed the mark on blogging regularly the last 5 or so months. Let's just skip to the chase and get down to it...life is never dull. I have ripped up my Wisconsin roots, and have been transplanted to California. I envisioned this, dreamt about being here closer to my sister, and perhaps even romanticized it. But the truth is, I miss home and feel out of sorts. I think that has been the theme for 2017 for me, but, I have certainly learned about myself and this world we live in. And also about how much I love a cup of coffee with frothy almond/coconut/soy milk (this is the BEST frother EVER...also, a just-because gift from my boo in the form of a milk frother is pretty amazing). I miss a lot of "things" from home, but this feeling of newness is not...new? In between moving 6 times and three different jobs over the last year, I feel that a perspective shift is in order to go along with my physical shifts.I have been meditating on the daily. I have been surrounding myself with people that I love, both physically and virtually (Jess Lively podcasts are amazing for life flow advice, Mimi Ikkon inspires me to take care of myself, and my favorite blogs have been picking up my less-than-creative feet the last few months; I even had the opportunity to meet Deb at a book signing here in Berkeley-so cool! We had a breif chat about caramel...I am sure I blushed a lot, and didn't get a coherent sentance out, but still!) 

    It is time to turn things around (damnit!), and I hope that energy of perserverance, love, courage, warmth and generosity fills your holiday season. Also, I hope cookies do too. Whether you are avoiding the gluten, not diggin' the dairy, or just love ALL OF THE BUTTAAAAH and traditional things (ahem, me lately-traditions and simplicity bring comfort in turbulent times!), I present to you my 2017 holiday cookie round-up. Cookies that a) I love to make and eat and share or b) look, smell and taste pretty darn amazing, and will likely grace my holiday baking line-up this year. But really, this cookie became one of my  favorites in grad school, when one of the amazing undergrads, who is a spectacular baker and up-and-coming food scientist with an amazing blog to boot, brought these in to the lab one day (I think) in July when I was knee-deep in grad-skool-stressful-things (research, 3rd degree burns from caramel, Karl Fischer titrations, etc), and found deep enjoyment in nomming the shit out of a few of these cookies for a break with coffee. The korokova is sure to please you and your loved ones and your co-workers and anyone really. The korokova cookie is a classic shortbread, enriched with brown sugar, intensified wtih cocoa powder, and made just *that* much more indulgent by flakes of chopped dark (dark! I mean it! like at least 70% cocoa solids, and chopped-not chips or chunks!) chocolate. Punctuated by a flakey sea salt top, these are just...magical! As Dorie mentions in the recipe here on Food52, these cookies are fairly forgiving as they are delicious (see note below for my only pieces of advice, namely avoiding over baking and volume measuring of flour and cocoa...and then, for the last time, go and get yourself a scale for baking!! I own this one and love it, and my sister has this one and it is also a fine piece of kitchen equipment).Perfect for a host/hostess gift, a care package to be shipped accross the country (they are surprisingly sturdy), for nibbling on with your early morning cup of chilly weekday/weekend coffee/coffee after lunch at work when you're evading reviewing labels/etc, etc. Rich, sweet, salty and full of chocolate. Seriously, happy holiday baking, friends. Find some of my favorite, tried-and-true cookies below that I love to have around for the holidays, along with a few of my tips for holiday cookie bliss!Notes: to help prevent the dreaded overbake with the korokova, you want to take the cookies out even if you *think* you are pulling them out of the oven too soon-they will still appear to be moist and will be very soft fresh out of the oven, so be sure to let these guys sit a few minutes to cool and to finish their bake on the hot sheet pan. Your patience and fearless confidence with these cookies will be rewarded with a dense, yet delicate, cookie. And when in doubt, if they are still a little too soft after cooling a few minutes on the pan, just put them back into the hot oven for 1-2 minutes to help finish the bake. My last note is to urge you to use a scale for weight measurements for these cookies (I own this one, and my sister has this one, and both work very well for baking as well as coffee making!), especially with the dry ingredients. If you *must* use volume, be sure to fluff your flour and cocoa powder before scooping into your measure cup, and level off the top without compacting. Dorie has similar notes in her Food52 recipe here! Also, I urge you to sift the dry ingredients, especially the cocoa powder, as lumpy cocoa powder can be game-over for these cookies. Last note, to help life be easeful, which is really welcome around the busy holidays for many of you: you can pre-make these cookies, roll into the logs, wrap in plastic wrap and freeze or throw in the fridge until you're ready to slice and bake. The dough will last in the fridge for a few days, and in the freezer for a few months. In fact, I think these guys are actually easier to slice when cold and firm; if baking from the freezer, try to remember to take the logs out to soften a bit, either overnight in the fridge or a hour or so on the counter at room temp. 


    2017 Holiday Cookie Round-Up:

    The Rich and Nutty: These polvorones from the Bojon Gourmet are just sweet enough, full of nuts as polvorones should be, have lovely texture, and are just fun...all coated in powdered sugar...messy cookies are the best! See here for Buckwheat Cacao Nib Polvorones!

    The Traditional: Ok, so these...these are where chocolate chunk cookies bull-doze chcolate chip cookies. These chocolate chunk cookies are *the* best, so of course, just the ticket for the holidays. Life hack: using the Pound Plus bar of dark chocolate from Trader Joe's works very well here (but if you have access and the sheer will to use your "good shit" from your dark chocolate stash, you will not be sorry). Get your ass over here for chocolate chunk cookie bliss!

    The Cozy and Spicy: Now, to tone it down a notch for those vegans in your life. I offer up Angela's recipe for oatmeal cookies. But not just any: these are studded with chocolate, full of nuts, and have pockets of gooey dates (yes, get the good dates for these, please! I love Del Real). A splash of whiskey or bourbon in these guys never hurt anyone, either. 

    *THE* Gingersnap: head over here to get Alice's gingersnap cookie. It is the best. Stop your search now, and just make these, get some coffee on to brew, and then enjoy the gingersnap-coffee due of bliss. Repeat as necessary. 

    The (other) Chocolate One: so, technically, the korkova I am going to share is "a" chocolate one hailing from Mr. Herme himself, but if you are feeling more fudgey-cookie-like, I highly recommend these gooey-chocolatey numbers from the Bojon Gourmet via Cookie & Kate. Pockets of chocolate, bits of crunchy sea salt, barely held together with buckwheat and tapioca flour. Yum. 

    The Crunchy One: do I even have to say it? Biscotti. My recipe here is a formula for success, with lots of room for flexibility. Use your favorite nut, add in your favorite citrus zest, play around with the fat source (olive oil! Coconut oil! Butter!), go traditional and add in brandy and anise seeds (and dunk into espresso). Just get to it! 


    Now, some tips that I find useful for holiday cookie baking (and cookie baking in general):

    -Pre-mix batters and doughs for cut-out/sliced/drop cookies; freeze whole logs (as in the korokova recipe I share below) or cookies already portioned and rolled into balls. You can even pre-coat gingersnaps with demerara sugar when you freeze them (see picture below!), place into a bag, and label with the baking time and temperature. Thaw logs of cookies overnight in the fridge, and bake pre-balled frozen cookies straight from the freezer (you may need to add a minute or two to the baking time, but seriously, this frozen cookie magic works beautifully!). Note: I have also had success with freezing polvorones already rolled in powdered sugar, too, but just beware that like all things involving powdered sugar, it may just get...everywhere...heh...

    -Bake a few batches of biscotti at a time and freeze. They freeze beautifully, and are also quickly "freshened" by a quick trip (5ish minutes) in a 350F oven. 

    -Parchment paper. Do I need to say more? Unless you like to clean sheet pans. I do not.

    -Sea salt. It adds a crunchy, contrasting flavor to many cookies...yes, even on the classics like oatmeal! I love Maldon (also take note of the 3.3lb tub of it...ha!) If you question paying $6-$8 for a box of salt, know that a box lasts for a few months at a time, and pinching the lovely crystals between your fingers and scattering them all over everything will bring you immense joy and pleasure! I promise!

    -Gift bags and boxes. I love to use simple clear cellophane bags (like these), twisted shut with a twist tie (go figure!), and optionally made more "festive" with ribbon. If you're like super-Martha, you could even pre-make bags of baked cookes and store in the freezer.

    -Cookies easily sub for a wonderful gift, host/hostess thank-you, and even a dessert if you're slated to bring "something" to a gathering. Who the hell ever said "no" to a holiday cookie assortment and a bottle of wine? 

    -Cookies have been proven* to boost morale; bring a tray to work, leave it in the break room, and feel goo about the fact that your are spreading that holiday cheer (just be sure to label with gluten, nuts, dairy, etc...because that is just the right thing to do!)

    -Cookies are acceptable for breakfast. Anytime, but especially around the holidays. 

    *just really speculating here, based on qualitative observation, but I think we can at least be 95% confident that this statement is more than likely true.



    Korkova Cookies (aka: World Peace Cookies) // Recipe from Pierre Herme, via Dorie Greenspan // Makes about 30 cookies // 

    • 1 stick plus 3 TB (150g) unsalted butter, room temperature*
    • 1 1/4 cups (175g) all purpose flour 
    • 1/3 cup (30g) natural cocoa powder
    • 1/2 tsp baking soda
    • 1/4 tsp sea salt (or, 1/2 tsp flakey sea salt, like Maldon)
    • 2/3 cup (120g) light brown sugar (pack the cup full if using volume measure)
    • 1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract, bourbon or coffee liquer
    • 5 oz (150g) (which is about 3/4 cup) chopped bittersweet (or darker chocolate as desired), no larger than 1/3" pieces

    *room temperature butter can be acheived by letting your butter sit at room temperature for at least a few hours, ideally overnight; the texture of the butter is fairly critical for this recipe, so don't try that microwave-softening trick...you know it doesn't work, right?

    1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, or a large bowl that will accomodate beating vigorously with a hand mixer, place the room temperature butter and beat for 2 minutes. Scrape down the bowl, and add the sugars, salt and vanilla extract (or bourbon or coffee liquor). Beat again for 2 minutes, at which point the mixture will be fluffy.

    2. Weigh and sift the dry ingredients (flour, cocoa powder, baking soda), pressing out any lumps through the sifter. If you are using volume measurements, be sure to fluff the flour and cocoa with a fork prior to scooping into the measuring cup, and leveling off without compacting, prior to sifting (see notes above).

    3. Gently mix the dry ingredients into the butter and sugar mixture, starting at the lowest speed on your mixer at first to avoid a flour/cocoa explosion, then mix on medium for a count 5 seconds, then stop and scrape down the bowl. Continue to mix until a crumbly dough comes together (it will be crumbly-don't be alarmed), taking care to not over mix (I repeat: crumbles are ok!). Scrape down the bowl again, add the chopped chocolate, and mix breifly until the dough looks consistently moist (but it will still be a bit crumbly).

    4. Using your hands, bring the mixture together into a crumbly but cohesive ball; divide into 2 portions, and roll each into a log that is 1 1/2" diameter (this is about 12" long). Do not stress about perfect logs here, as you can roll into a more even log once the dough is in plastic wrap if you wish. Roll in plastic wrap, taking a few seconds to make the logs more even if desired. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours, or up to 3 days (or put into the freezer for up to a few months; thaw overnight in fridge before slicing and baking).

    5. Preheat oven to 325F. Taking the logs straight from the fridge, using a sharp non-serrated knife, slice into 1/2" segments. Each log should yield about 15 1/2" rounds. Crumbles will happen, so gently press and encourage the dough back into rounds. Place about 1" apart on baking sheets, optionally lined with parchment or Silpat. Sprinkle the tops with flakey sea salt if desired. Bake for 12 minutes, at which point the cookies will look quite moist, but this is normal; allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheet until just warm to the touch, then cool on racks. If after cooled the cookies are underbaked, simply return to the 325F oven for 2 minutes longer, and again allow to cool until just warm to the touch. 

    6. Enjoy fresh, or hoard at room temperature for up to a few days. The baked cookies can also be frozen, and enjoyed straight from there will be firm, crunchy and delightfully chewy. Dunking into hot coffee is encouraged!



    On the sheet, sprinkled with sea salt (I love Maldon), ready to bake. Success is sweet, chocolate-y and sea salt-y. Mmmm.Ready the coffee, tea, gift bags and/or boxes. These guys are amazing to share, savor and delight in. Enjoy!

     

  • Orange, Hazelnut & Bourbon Biscotti // Lemon, Black Pepper & Walnut Biscotti

    **Update! August 2017: Turns out, lemon zest, walnuts and freshly ground black pepper make a delcious, floral and juuuust spicy enough combination to tickle your tongue...highly recommended for a lighter flavor-perfect for all seasons. See recipe notes below!**

    Alright. I don't exactly know how it is already December, BUT I do know that the holidays=cookie season. And hot beverage season. So naturally, biscotti rank high on my cookie list. Nothing is as satisfying as dunking a crunchy, nutty cookie into a hot cup of coffee (or whatever your hot beverage of choice is!). 

    I don't know about you, but, anytime during the day I can mentally and physically slow down enough to sit, make coffee or tea, and enjoy a treat is something I cherish. And even if you cannot manage to do this exact ritual, or don't need the sugar/caffeine rush, I think it is healthy to slow down during the day, take some deep breaths, and focus on the present. For December, I am making this practice one of my values for the month. Whether I will choose to do this before going to work amidst my morning routine, mid-day during work, or when I get home, I want to get back into expressing gratitude and being present each day (even if it is just for 5 minutes!). Because really, I think being a sane, grateful and kind person is a valuable gift we can give to the people in our lives, and our world at large, especially during the often stressful, emotional and hectic holiday season. Now, back to cookies! To be perfectly honest, this was my first ever batch of non-anise seed studded biscotti. Not going to lie, it felt a liiiittle like betrayal. My go-to recipe is from my Aunt (which she got from her mother-in-law, who is from Italian stock), and I have many fond memories of coming home after school, and being elated when seeing a small container of the golden crusted, anise seed studded cookies. Not too sweet, super crunchy, speckled with little bursts of black licorice from the anise seeds that would inevitably get stuck in your teeth, where they would hide as flavor bombs well after you were done munching. A perfect after school snack, I could easily munch down 3 or 4 of these treats while procrastinating on getting started with my homework (because eating biscotti > doing homework).

    But I realize that anise can be a polarizing flavor. When anise is invited to the holiday party, you know damn well that it will be staying for a while. Get out of the way, because anise likes to party-invading the dance floor, drinking all the holiday punch, and making a scene. And who drank the last of the egg nog? You bet your ass that it was anise. The presence of anise, strong and pronounced, is known immediately, and understandably, not everyone cares for this. Enter: a plays-well-with-others, even-tempered orange and hazelnut character, mellowed with vanilla and bourbon. I was extremely happy with the results after tweaking an Alice Medrich recipe to my liking (from "Chew Gooey Crispy Crunch Melt-In-Your-Mouth Cookies"): the crunch factor and texture were spot-on, the flavors were well balanced, and the test of dunking a biscotto into a hot foamy latte passed with flying colors (and don't worry, I verified this seveal times for research purposes). Beyond being delicious treats to savor alone, or with a mug of hot-something, biscotti of any variety are ideal for the holidays: they keep very well, growing crunchier as they sit (put them in a pretty container on your counter next to your coffee maker); they also ship with ease, and travel like champions, so are perfect for sending to people you love around the holidays (and I don't think any sane host/hostess would turn down a tin of biscotti as a thank-you gift!). Simply put: make a big batch, store them in the freezer or on the counter in an air-tight container or jar, then share and enjoy! Notes: while the hazelnut flavor is amazing, I realize finding good quality raw hazelnuts to toast at home is a challenge at times, so substituting your favorite raw nut of choice, and freshly toasting at home, would be perfectly acceptable. Walnuts, almonds, pistachios, and even pecans, would work here (or heck, try a combination!). They key, as I mentionted, is to freshly toast raw nuts to ensure optiumum freshness and flavor. Using your discretion based on what type of nut you use, adapt which extracts and booze to use in the recipe, but please strive to use pure extracts, and booze that you would actually drink (i.e. no Fleishmann's here!). I favor a high quality vanilla extract, and am working through a bottle of Four Roses Single Barrel. Rum, Drambuie, Frangelico, Brandy and Sambucca are all worthy contenders, based on your preferences for booze. In addition, seek out high quality extracts, reading ingredient labels to make sure no corn syrup or other nasty additives are present. And lastly, yes, the orange zest would be completely adaptable to another type of citrus zest (lemon! lime! bergamot!), but is also completely optional if you get right down to it. One could also sneak in some finely chopped dark chocolate as well to this recipe! But truly, the orange/hazelnut/bourbon combination is a winner for sure. 



    Orange & Hazelnut Biscotti // Lemon, Walnut & Black Pepper Biscotti**// makes 15-18 larger 4" to 6" long cookies, or 24 smaller 2" to 3"  long cookies //

    • 1 heaping cup whole hazelnuts, or nut of choice, freshly toasted
    • 1 cup (4.5 oz) unbleached all purpose flour*
    • 1 cup  (4.5 oz) spelt flour*
    • 1 1/4 tsp baking powder
    • 1/4 tsp sea salt
    • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
    • 1 cup (7 oz) sugar
    • zest of 1 orange, or citrus of choice, organic if possible
    • 4 TB melted butter, or 4 TB extra virgin olive oil
    • 3 large eggs
    • 2 TB bourbon, or booze of choice
    • 2 tsp vanilla extract, or extract of choice

    *feel free to use either 100% all purpose flour OR 100% spelt flour, or a combination as noted

    **to make the lemon, walnut & black pepper variation, replace orange zest with lemon zest, walnuts with hazelnuts (no need to peel the walnuts!), and add 1 heaping teaspoon of *freshly* ground black pepper, with more finely ground working the best (or else you'll sift most of it out). As for extracts and booze, you can omit them entirely and let the flavors of the lemon and black pepper shine, or do as you wish, and add the bourbon and vanilla!**

    1. Preheat oven to 350F. Spread nuts on a parchment or silpat lined baking sheet. Toast nuts until fragrant, about 7-10 minutes. If using hazelnuts, after toasting, transfer slightly cooled nuts to a kitchen towel, wrap, and begin to rub the skins off by massaging the hazelnuts in the towel. Shake partially skinned hazelnuts into a colander, rub together with hands to get remaining skins off. 

    2. Transfer skinned nuts into bowl of food processor, and process into a coarse meal. Alternatively, coarsely chop nuts with a sharp knife. 

    3. In a large bowl, sift the flour, baking powder, sea salt and nutmeg. Add chopped nuts and stir to combine. 

    4. In another large bowl, combine the sugar and the orange zest. Rub together to work the oils out of the orange zest until the sugar is moist and fragrant with the orange oil. Whisk in the eggs, one at a time, followed by the melted butter or olive oil, and then finally whisk in the booze and extracts. 

    5. Pour the wet mixture over the dry mixture with the chopped nuts. Stir until a moist, thick and sticky batter is formed. Using lightly oiled or moistened hands, turn the batter out onto a an oiled parchment or silpat lined baking sheet. Form the batter into a long rectangle of even thickness that is 12"-14" long and 4"-5" wide, using the larger measurements for smaller, shorter cookies. 

    6. Bake the rectangle for 45-50 minutes, until firm to the touch and dry in appearance. Allow the log to cool for 15-30 minutes, until cool to touch, and then slice using a serratd knife into 1/2" to 1" thick slices. If desired, cut on a bias or a diagonal. Place sliced biscotto back onto the baking sheet, and return to the oven for the second bake for 40-55 minutes, flipping the cookies halfway through baking, until golden brown. Allow to cool, and then store in airtight containers at room temperature or in the freezer.



  • Happy Halloween + Chocolate Buckwheat Granola

    Happy Halloween!! I hope everyone is either carving pumpkins (we did for the first time in a loooong time), drinking lots of cider (spiked with bourbon/whiskey if needed), and soaking in the last day of October. What month! It flew by. That is scary. Kinda like how today should be!! Boo!

    I am taking the morning off from school. First, I'll be having a breakfast with my bestie: pancakes, mimosas, homemade hashbrowns if I am ambitious enough/can convince my boyfriend to peel and grate the ptoatos, bloody Mary's for those who like tomato juice (i.e. not me), coffee, etc...you know the drill. I'll probably make a scary green smoothie, too, cause that's how I roll. After that, we'll be hauling our full bellies to the Badger game!! My friend, Shannon, is usually awesome enough to drag my sorry bum to a home game once a year. She rocks at school/Wisconsin spirit, I do not. But, I will be wearing a cute vintage red sweater....so that counts right? Go Badgers!! After the game, I'll be doing some sort of movie marathon and stuffing my face with chili and cornbread with my boyfriend. I mean, it is a holiday....

    I wanted to share this super tasty, excuse-to-eat-chocolate, crunchy and great-for-you CHOCOLATE granola today. It seemed like the right thing to do, on a holiday that is usually full of candy. Not that there is anything wrong with that on a day like today, but maybe give your body some lovin' with some nourishing and tasty granola while your at it. This granola does contain sugar, but hey, you're already eating granola...so live a little. I am usually a purist when it comes to granola, but the strong cocoa or cacao powder really needs a sweet backdrop to shine. You may be able to use more liquid sweetener, but be careful, as it may burn due to its higher fructose content (especially agave and honey!)...and as you may have guessed, this granola is already dark, it is hard to tell if it has burned. If you do substitute the sugar for a liquid sweetener, I'd love to hear about it!

    This stuff is SUPER easy to throw, erm, mix together! To make it even more speedy and reduce dishes, I used the weight measurements for most of the ingredients (but feel free to use your volume measures if you don't have a kitchen scale, both are included!). I initially planned to send the lot of it to my sister for her birthday last week, but decided against it. I thought some gluten-free and vegan brownies, choc full of walnuts, dark chocolate and topped with Maldon were a better brithday treat...no? Well, at any rate, the hardest part about this recipe is waiting for it to bake. 

    ps: this stuff would still make a great gift. Pour some in a jar + ribbon + label = insta gift!! 

    And the BEST part? You get chocolate milk after you eat a bowl of this stuff! Kinda like a hippy-dippy version of Cocoa Pebbles! I enjoyed my first bowl with a fresh batch of homemade almond milk, but do your thing, and use whatever type of milk is your jam. The original recipe is from Sarah over at My New Roots. I recently picked up her book for a gift for my sister, and after reading through the copy I shipped to her, I HAD to order myself one! So glad I did, because that book is amazing, and full of creative, delicious looking recipes. I can't wait to use it more!!

    So happy Halloween, or just Saturday. Enjoy your day, and revel in October's last stance! Happy Granola'ing!!!

    Notes: as mentioned, this recipe does contain cane sugar. Feel free to experiment with liquid sweetner, but be cautious of burning. Indeed, this granola is dark, so you'll want to keep a close eye on it and taste it towards the last 10 minutes of baking, as Sarah mentions in the original. The buckwheat groats are NOT kasha. Kasha=toasted buckwheat, raw buckwheat groats=raw not toasted buckwheat groats. Get the latter, not the former, since you're toasting your own! Look in the bulk aisle of a well-stocked grocery store, co-op or Whole Foods. And please don't skip them, their crunch is integral to this recipe, and they are super good for you and your digestive system! To help boost the fiber even more, and lend binding power, I added 2 TB ground flax seeds. After munching on the finished product, I could see replacing chia seeds with ground flax entirely, but up to you. To also help bind this stuff and make it more easy to digest, and other granolas, I always process a portion of the oats and all the nuts in my food processor for a few seconds. Feel free to not do this, and stick to the original's recipe instructions, but I find that the final granola is so much more aromatic and delicous if I give some of the hearty ingredients a quick blitz in the food pro. And last, but most importantly: I had to resist the urge to throw in some chopped super-dark chocolate or even some high-quality chocolate chips. I suggest you strongly consider doing this...or just add some of your favorite dried fruit as you eat it. Noms all around!



    Chocolate + Buckwheat Granola // plant-based; vegan; gluten-free; soy-free // makes about 8 cups of granola //

    • 3 cups (300g) gluten-free rolled oats 
    • 1 cup (200g) buckwheat groats (not kasha, see note above)
    • 1 1/2 cups (65 to 80g) shredded or flaked unsweetened coconut (I used finely shredded, but the big flakes work too)
    • 1 cup (125g) hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds, pecans, or combination thereof (I used 50:50 hazelnuts:walnuts)
    • 1/4 cup (30g) chia seeds (or sub with ground flax)
    • 2 TB (15g) ground flax seeds (optional, don't add if you use 1/4 cup ground flax above)
    • 1/4 tsp sea salt
    • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
    • 1/4 cup organic cane sugar, sucanant, or coconut sugar
    • 1/3 cup maple syrup, agave or honey
    • 1/3 cup melted virgin coconut oil
    • 1 tsp vanilla
    • 1/2 cup (120g) raw cacao powder (I used this one) or good quality cocoa powder (either Dutched/alkalized or natural would work here)
    • Optional Add In's Post Bake: dried fruit, like cherries or cranberries or apricots would be delish, or even some extra dark chocolate chunks or chips. Note: I like to add my dried fruit as I eat granola, not mix in the entire batch as it tends to dry out and get too chewy for my taste. 

    1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a large baking tray with parchment. In a small bowl or sauce pan, melt the coconut oil in the microwave or stove. Stir in the sugar, liquid sweetener, sea salt, cinnamon, vanilla and cocoa/cacao powder. Stir until completely smooth and set aside.

    2. Measure or weigh out the nuts and half of the oats into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a few times to break up the nuts and oats until you have medium pieces. Dump into a large bowl, and measure or weigh out the remaining ingredients.

    3. Pour the wet chocolate mixture over the dry mixture, and stir well to combine. Taste, adjust cinnamon, sea salt and sweetness if desired.

    4. Dump onto prepared baking tray, pressing down firmly with your hands or the mixing tool you used. Bake for 20 minutes, give it a good flip/stir, and firmly pat back down onto the sheet using your stirring tool. Bake for another 10-15 minutes, stirring a few times during these last minutes to ensure the granola isn't burning by tasting it and smelling. Once done, shut the oven off, crack the oven door at least half-way, and allow the granola to sit undisturbed (I like to let it sit overnight-I keep it in the oven to allow the residual heat to firm it up and to also keep it out of my sight to avoid eating a ton of it out of the oven-you can also cool it on a cooling rack). The granola will firm-up and get more crunchy once cooled. Break up and store in an air-tight container. Lasts for a few weeks at room temperature, or for up to 3 months in the freezer. 



    With everything in your pantry now in this granola, you can feel like a superhero! A granola superhero. Boom!I always pulse half the oats, and all of the nuts for my granolas. I really love the texture, and find that the final granola is much more aromatic and well...nutty!

    The chocolate goo holding this stuff together. Mmmm...chocolate goo....Everything all mixed, ready to bake. This mixture itself tasted pretty rad.

    Ok, now using the mixing tool or your hands, pat the granola down firmly onto a parchment lined baking sheet, and bake! Taste towards the last 10 or so minutes of baking, to make sure this stuff isn't burning.And after baking! This stuff smells like a brownie baking. No joke.Put into an air-tight containe or jar, and enjoy! With homemade almond milk, this was truly a hippy-dippy spin-off of cocoa pebbles. Yessss!And chocolate milk after!And plenty more for later!!!